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A2Z Homeschool - THE A-to-Z of Homeschooling
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Can Homeschoolers Get Into College?

Can Homeschooled Children Get Into Good Colleges?
Karl Bunday’s thorough reassurance that homeschoolers do indeed get into the best colleges. He keeps list updated alphabetically by college name. Last updated in 2006.

Frequently Asked Questions About Unschooling High School and College with Alison Mckee
Whether your children are schooled, traditionally educated at home or unschooled, college admissions is not a guarantee. Don’t fret, though, unschooled children are quite successful at getting into college. Not only are they getting into college but they are doing well once they get there.

Homeschooled students take unorthodox route to become top college candidates
Homeschoolers seem to be carrying off the transition into the mainstream well, with many getting into schools of their choice despite their unorthodox backgrounds. By Pamela R. Winnick, Post-Gazette Staff Writer.

Home-Schooled Teens Ripe for College
Myths about unsocialized home-schoolers are false, and most are well prepped for college, experts say.

Homeschooled Students Well-Prepared For College, Study Finds
“The possibilities of showing all the kinds of things that colleges are looking for — curiosity, confidence, resourcefulness, ability to deal with challenges — you name it. That’s a part of being a home-schooled student.” Marjorie Hansen Shaevitz, Stanford University.


In a Class by Themselves
A wave of homeschoolers has reached the Farm–students with unconventional training and few formal credentials. What have they got that Stanford wants? And how do admission officers spot it?

Homeschool Friendly Colleges
By US state. Includes military academies. From Homeschool Facts.com.

Schoolhouse Rocked
Most surprising of all is that Harvard, BU, Brown, and other colleges are welcoming home-schoolers like all other students.


There’s a new path to Harvard and it’s not in a classroom
Away from the standardized tests and rigid schedules in public education, kids can let their creative sides flourish, learn about the world they live in, and, when it’s time, earn acceptance into the best colleges in the world.

Top universities want you to homeschool
It’s not that top universities are telling people directly to homeschool their kids. Instead, top schools are using a selection process that gives homeschooled kids a huge advantage. Here’s why.


Yet Another Study Confirms The Effectiveness of Home Education
In the sample the author studied, there were 137 public school graduates, 142 students who graduated from catholic schools, and 129 homeschool graduates. The author compared four things among the three groups of students: SAT or ACT score, college grade point average (GPA), GPA by major, and GPA in the university’s “core” curriculum. The results are very interesting, and they demonstrate yet again that homeschooled students are simply better prepared for college than their publicly- and privately-schooled counterparts.

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2 Responses to Can Homeschoolers Get Into College?

  1. […] the twelfth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “Can they go to college, I could never do that, what about graduation, they’ll miss the prom, why do you do this, […]

  2. Free K12 Homeschooling | A2Z Homeschooling on April 22, 2015 at 11:27 am

    […] So, if you use a lot of free online resources, and get books and games at the public library or at places where you can buy inexpensive “recycled” materials, and use free or shareware software programs, can your teen still go to college? […]

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